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2004 Chevy Avalanche Best 2" Lift Kit

Fortecor

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2023
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2
My 2004 Avalanche has the stock suspension, I only have 132k miles on it. I just redid the steering and installed BFG All-Terrains 285 70 R17. I am looking to put a 2" lift on it. The problem is, I don't want to go from a smooth ride to a stiff ride that makes your fillings fall out when you hit a small rock in the road. I've had 4" Rancho lift kit a long time ago on another truck and it was so stiff it was as if there were no shocks whatsoever. I'd like to maintain as much of the comfort of the stock ride as possible but with the comfort add the 2" lift. I'd love to hear everyone's opinions on what you would do and why.

Thank you everyone
 
My 2004 Avalanche has the stock suspension, I only have 132k miles on it. I just redid the steering and installed BFG All-Terrains 285 70 R17. I am looking to put a 2" lift on it. The problem is, I don't want to go from a smooth ride to a stiff ride that makes your fillings fall out when you hit a small rock in the road. I've had 4" Rancho lift kit a long time ago on another truck and it was so stiff it was as if there were no shocks whatsoever. I'd like to maintain as much of the comfort of the stock ride as possible but with the comfort add the 2" lift. I'd love to hear everyone's opinions on what you would do and why.

Thank you everyone
What did you do to the steering? rebuild the box, or replace, or that plastic bearing in the shaft, what was your steering issue? Mine has improved with new tires and shocks, in going to add a level, but when I go down the highway I feel I guess what others refer to as the float feeling.
 
The float is from tires and shocks these trucks stock and call for a p-metric tire that's a very soft tire by design its only 4 ply. I recommend a d rated tire. those are a 8 ply lt tire it makes the driving feel infinitely better IMHO.
 
The float is from tires and shocks these trucks stock and call for a p-metric tire that's a very soft tire by design its only 4 ply. I recommend a d rated tire. those are a 8 ply lt tire it makes the driving feel infinitely better IMHO.
Thank you.
 
One other consideration concerning that "floating" or side to side unstable feeling. That is as MarineOne said, a low load bearing tire. But simply changing to a load range higher doesn't completely solve that feeling. It's because the sidewalls are the cause, keeping the same aspect ratio will keep nearly the same sidewall height but the sidewalls will be somewhat stiffer in a higher load range.

A higher load rating necessarily needs higher air pressure which needs stiffer sidewalls. The stiffer sidewalls reduce ride quality but firm up the responsiveness of the tire. Tires that have tall sidewalls will always be a compromise. However, higher load ratings don't necessarily mean the tire should have a lot of air in them.


For example - a load range E tire. Max load is allowed at max air pressure of around 80PSI. Max load for these tire means that one tire will support just around 3300lbs give or take 300lbs. Knowing the actual weight of your vehicle (not the owners manual curb weight) helps in determining the correct air pressure to use.

Regardless, a high aspect ratio sidewall will float side to side no matter what. A heavier load range will mitigate that float somewhat, but won't eliminate it and the compromise is a slightly rougher ride, depending on what air pressure you are at. I use load range E on every vehicle I own because I live 2-1/2 miles off the pavement on Iowa gravel roads. I learned from much flat tire changing experience on the side of the road - rock drilling is common on lower rated LT tires and P-metric passenger car tires.
 
One other consideration concerning that "floating" or side to side unstable feeling. That is as MarineOne said, a low load bearing tire. But simply changing to a load range higher doesn't completely solve that feeling. It's because the sidewalls are the cause, keeping the same aspect ratio will keep nearly the same sidewall height but the sidewalls will be somewhat stiffer in a higher load range.

A higher load rating necessarily needs higher air pressure which needs stiffer sidewalls. The stiffer sidewalls reduce ride quality but firm up the responsiveness of the tire. Tires that have tall sidewalls will always be a compromise. However, higher load ratings don't necessarily mean the tire should have a lot of air in them.


For example - a load range E tire. Max load is allowed at max air pressure of around 80PSI. Max load for these tire means that one tire will support just around 3300lbs give or take 300lbs. Knowing the actual weight of your vehicle (not the owners manual curb weight) helps in determining the correct air pressure to use.

Regardless, a high aspect ratio sidewall will float side to side no matter what. A heavier load range will mitigate that float somewhat, but won't eliminate it and the compromise is a slightly rougher ride, depending on what air pressure you are at. I use load range E on every vehicle I own because I live 2-1/2 miles off the pavement on Iowa gravel roads. I learned from much flat tire changing experience on the side of the road - rock drilling is common on lower rated LT tires and P-metric passenger car tires.
Thanks, good info to have.
 
I just wanted to elaborate a tiny bit on the side to side squishy floating feeling.

To see what I mean air both rear tires down on one end about halfway and then push the truck sideways by hand and watch what the rim does in the tire. There's your side to side floating feeling even at recommended pressures.

Another, less likely cause is broken belting in the sidewalls. If one of the sidewall plies moves inside the rubber it's considered "broken". This leaves a soft spot in one area of the sidewall. While driving slowly on smooth pavement this shows up like a dog's butt wagging its tail. The entire rear end (or the steering wheel in the front) wiggles side to side. Faster rotation eliminates the feel but not the danger. That tire needs replaced ASAP. Like I said, tire quality is good these days, even Chinese tires, so this doesn't happen often as far as I know now.
 
GOODYEAR WRANGLER WORKHORSE HT there not bad, E load range.
 
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