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Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Hi guys I really need some help here. So the last mechanic I had welded on my ball joints and it broke but also put and swapped out my parts cuz they had no rust on them. So I'm like f it I'll do it all myself. Im doing the front CV axles, front rotors, brakes, front struts, inner and outer tie rods. I finally pain stakingly got everything off and I'm putting the CV axle in first. I was told the main axle nut is 180 torque, but is there a sequence and torque to the 6 bolts of the axle that go on the front differential? If so what is itt please. I also need to know if there's torque for all the rest I mentioned that I am replacing please.
I'm a small mountain town girl and moved to the east coast from California. Nobody knows me here so they keep ripping me off and don't know I work on my own cars. I don't have a garage here so couldn't do everything in - degrees with 3ft of snow is why I trusted a mechanic. Last guy basically destroyed my front end. THANK YOU ALL SOOO MUCH THAT HELP ME WITH MY QUESTION. I'm waiting with the torque wrench, 😆
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
I should have all you need, let me know if you need something more. Here is direct from the GM dealer service manual:

Anytime you have a "circle of nuts" to tighten (like below axle to flang and the lug nuts) you should do in a "star" pattern. Never do a "circle" pattern. Same with basically any multi-nut tightening situation.

For example using the wheel lug nuts (your's are 140 lb ft. torque):

1633679852590.png





The "Hub Nut" is what you call the main axle nut, per the manual, ***BE SURE TO GET NEW ONES DO NOT USE THE OLD ONES*** You can get GM original (I did recently) from Rock Auto for $6 each or Amazon or local shop.

Application​
Specification​
Metric​
English​
Hub Nut​
240 N·m​
177 lb ft​
Inboard Flange Bolts​
79 N·m​
58 lb ft​
Small Seal Retaining Clamp​
136 N·m​
100 lb ft​


Wheel Drive Shaft Replacement​

Tools Required
J 45859 Axle Remover (Should NOT NEED, just rubber mallet and tap axle from hub)

Removal Procedure


1633676197661.png

  1. Raise the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the wheel and tire assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  3. Remove the drive axle center cap, if equipped.

1633676215479.png



4. Insert a drift or a large screwdriver through the brake caliper into 1 of the brake rotor vanes in order to prevent the drive axle wheel drive shaft from turning.
5. Remove the nut and the washer from the hub. Do not reuse the nut. A new nut must be used when installing the wheel drive shaft.
6. Using the J 45859 or equivalent, press the wheel drive shaft from the hub.

1633676289303.png


7. Remove the 6 bolts (1) securing the wheel drive shaft inboard flange to the output shaft flange.
8. Remove the drift from the rotor.
9. Remove the stabilizer shaft link from the lower control arm. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in Front Suspension.
10. Wrap shop towels around both the inner and the outer wheel drive shaft boots in order to avoid damage to the boots during removal and installation.
11. Pull the wheel drive shaft through the lower control arm opening.

Installation Procedure


1633676364569.png

  1. Wrap shop towels around both the inner and the outer wheel drive shaft boots in order to avoid damage to the boots during removal and installation. Important
    Clean the steering knuckle and the wheel drive shaft splines and threads. These areas must be dry and free of grease, dirt, and contamination.
  2. Insert the wheel drive shaft splined shank into the knuckle hub.
    Notice
    Use only a genuine GM front wheel drive shaft nut. Installation of anything but an OEM front wheel drive shaft nut could cause damage to the vehicle.
  3. Install the washer (3) and the new hub nut (2) to the wheel drive shaft. Do not tighten the new hub nut at this time.
  4. Attach the wheel drive shaft inboard flange to the output shaft flange using the inboard flange bolts (1).
    1633676568652.pngNotice
    Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.
  5. Insert a drift or a large screwdriver through the brake caliper into 1 of the brake rotor vanes in order to prevent the wheel drive shaft from turning. Tighten
    • Tighten the inboard flange bolts to 79 N·m (58 lb ft).
    • Tighten the hub nut to 240 N·m (177 lb ft).
  6. Remove the drift from the rotor.1633676677405.png
  7. Install the drive axle center cap, if equipped.
  8. Install the stabilizer shaft link. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in Front Suspension.
  9. Install the wheel and tire assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  10. Lower the vehicle.
 

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2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?

Stabilizer Shaft Replacement​

Removal Procedure

  1. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  3. Remove the stabilizer links. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Link Replacement .1633677015731.png
  4. Remove the oil pan skid plate, if equipped.
  5. Remove the stabilizer shaft insulator bracket bolts (3).1633677041839.png
  6. Remove the stabilizer shaft bracket (2).
  7. Remove the stabilizer shaft (4).
  8. Remove the stabilizer shaft insulators (1).
  9. Inspect all of the parts for wear and damage.

Installation Procedure


1633677107602.png

Important​

Place the insulators on the stabilizer shaft with the slits facing toward the front of the vehicle.

1. Install the insulators (1) to the stabilizer shaft (4).
2. Install the stabilizer shaft (4).
3. Install the brackets (2) over the insulators and the stabilizer shaft.

Notice​

Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.

4. Install insulator bracket bolts (3).
Tighten
Tighten the bolts to 50 N·m (37 lb ft).

5. Install the stabilizer links. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Link Replacement .

1633677227162.png

6. Install the oil pan skid plate, if equipped.
Tighten
Tighten the oil pan skid plate retaining bolts to 20 N·m (15 lb ft).
7. Install the tire and wheel assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
8. Remove the safety stands
9. Lower the vehicle.
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?

Stabilizer Shaft Link Replacement​

Removal Procedure

  1. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the stabilizer shaft nut (1) from the link bolt.1633677345671.png
  3. Remove the stabilizer shaft link bolt (3).
  4. Remove the stabilizer shaft link insulators and spacers (2).
  5. Inspect all of the parts for wear and damage.

Installation Procedure

  1. Install the stabilizer shaft link insulators and spacers (2).
  2. 1633677415986.pngPerform the following procedure before installing the stabilizer link bolts.​

    • Remove all traces of the original adhesive patch.
    • Apply Threadlocker GM P/N 12345382 (Candian P/N 10953489) BLUE LOCTITE # 242 on the threads of the bolts.
  3. Install the stabilizer shaft link bolts (3).
    Notice
    Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.
  4. Install the stabilizer shaft nut (1) to the link bolt. Tighten Tighten the nut to 10 N·m (89 lb in).
  5. Remove the safety stands
  6. Lower the vehicle.

 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Tie Rod:

Installation Procedure1633677740023.png

  1. Lubricate the tie rod threads with chassis lubricant. Refer to Fluid and Lubricant Recommendations in Maintenance and Lubrication.
  2. Install the tie rod end (4) to the shaft (6).
  3. Install the outer tie rod ball stud (3) to the steering knuckle (1).1633677805759.png
  4. Install the new prevailing torque nut (2) to the outer tie rod ball stud (3).
  5. Tighten
    • Tighten the nut to 50 N·m (37 lb ft) for 15 series vehicles.
    • Tighten the nut to 65 N·m (48 lb ft) for 25/35 series vehicles.
  6. Adjust the front toe. Refer to Measuring Wheel Alignment in Wheel Alignment.
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Inner tie rod:

Tie Rod Replacement - Inner​

Tools Required

J 34028 Inner Tie Rod Wrench

Removal Procedure

  1. Raise the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the engine protection shield, if equipped. Refer to Engine Protection Shield Replacement in Frame and Underbody.
  3. Remove the outer tie rod end. Refer to Tie Rod Replacement .
  4. Remove the inner tie rod end using the J 34028 (2).1633678070313.png

Installation Procedure



Important​

Perform the following procedure before installing the new tie rod ends:

  1. Remove all traces of the oil, grease, or other contaminents.
  2. Clean the threads of the tie rod with denatured alcohol or the equivalent and allow to dry.
  3. Apply red LOCTITE Threadlocker, GM P/N 12345493 (Canadian P/N 1095348:cool: to the threads of the inner tie rod. Notice
    Refer to Fastener Notice in Cautions and Notices.1633678189750.png
  4. Install the inner tie rod to the relay rod. Tighten Using the J 34028 (2) tighten the tie rod to 100 N·m (74 lb ft).
  5. Install the outer tie rod end. Refer to Tie Rod Replacement .
  6. Install the engine protection shield, if equipped. Refer to Engine Protection Shield Replacement in Frame and Underbody.
  7. Lower the vehicle.
  8. Verify the wheel alignment. Refer to Wheel Alignment Specifications in Wheel Alignment.
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Other Torque settings you may need:

Calipers:

If you removed the calipers completely be sure to use the HIGH TEMP red threadlocker (Threadlocker GM P/N 12345493) not the "regular" red threadlocker on the two mounting bolts (Caliper Mounting Bracket to Knuckle).

Note when done:
  1. With the engine OFF, gradually apply the brake pedal to approximately 2/3 of its travel distance.
  2. Slowly release the brake pedal.
  3. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 7-8 until a firm pedal is obtained. This will properly seat the brake caliper pistons and brake pads.

Application​
Specification​
Metric​
English​
Backing Plate Bolts​
135 N·m​
100 lb ft​
Brake Hose to Caliper Bolt-Front​
40 N·m​
30 lb ft​
Brake Hose to Caliper Bolt-Rear​
40 N·m​
30 lb ft​
Caliper Bleed Screw​
12 N·m​
106 lb in​
Caliper Guide Pin Bolt-Front​
108 N·m​
80 lb ft​
Caliper Guide Pin Bolt, Rear-15 series​
42 N·m​
31 lb ft​
Caliper Guide Pin Bolt, Rear-25 series​
108 N·m​
80 lb ft​
Caliper Mounting Bracket to Backing Plate, Rear (JC5/JH5)​
200 N·m​
148 lb ft​
Caliper Mounting Bracket to Backing Plate, Rear (JH6)​
165 N·m​
122 lb ft​
Caliper Mounting Bracket to Knuckle, Front-15 series​
175 N·m​
129 lb ft​
Caliper Mounting Bracket to Knuckle, Front-25 series​
300 N·m​
221 lb ft​
Intermediate Cable Threaded Rod Nut​
3.5 N·m​
31 lb in​
 
Last edited:

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?

Fastener Tightening Specifications​

Metric​
English​
Application​
Specification​
Axle Shaft Nut​
240 N·m​
177 lb ft​
Brake Hose Bracket Bolt​
9 N·m​
80 lb in​
Brake Hose Clip Bolts​
12 N·m​
106 lb in​
Hub and Bearing Assembly to Steering Knuckle Bolts​
180 N·m​
133 lb ft​
Jounce Bumper Stud Nut​
30 N·m​
22 lb ft​
Lower Ball Joint to Lower Control Arm Nuts​
70 N·m​
52 lb ft​
Lower Ball Joint Stud Nut​
100 N·m​
74 lb ft​
Lower Control Arm to Frame Nuts (2WD)
145 N·m​
107 lb ft​
Lower Control Arm to Frame Nuts (4WD) 25/355 Series 2WD​
150 N·m​
110 lb ft​
Oil Pan Skid Plate Bolts
20 N·m​
15 lb ft​
Shock Absorber Tennon Nut (4WD)​
20 N·m​
15 lb ft​
Shock Absorber to Lower Control Arm Bolts (2WD)
25 N·m​
18 lb ft​
Shock Absorber to Lower Control Arm Nut (4WD)​
80 N·m​
59 lb ft​
Stabilizer Shaft Insulator Clamp Bolts​
50 N·m​
37 lb ft​
Stabilizer Shaft Link Nuts​
10 N·m​
89 lb in​
Torsion Bar Crossmember Bolts
95 N·m​
70 lb ft​
Torsion Bar Support Mounting Nuts​
95 N·m​
70 lb ft​
Upper Ball Joint Stud Nut​
50 N·m​
37 lb ft​
Upper Control Arm to Frame Nuts​
190 N·m​
140 lb ft​
Wheel Speed Sensor Mounting Bolt
18 N·m​
13 lb ft​

 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Hi guys I really need some help here. So the last mechanic I had welded on my ball joints and it broke but also put and swapped out my parts cuz they had no rust on them. So I'm like f it I'll do it all myself. Im doing the front CV axles, front rotors, brakes, front struts, inner and outer tie rods. I finally pain stakingly got everything off and I'm putting the CV axle in first. I was told the main axle nut is 180 torque, but is there a sequence and torque to the 6 bolts of the axle that go on the front differential? If so what is itt please. I also need to know if there's torque for all the rest I mentioned that I am replacing please.
I'm a small mountain town girl and moved to the east coast from California. Nobody knows me here so they keep ripping me off and don't know I work on my own cars. I don't have a garage here so couldn't do everything in - degrees with 3ft of snow is why I trusted a mechanic. Last guy basically destroyed my front end. THANK YOU ALL SOOO MUCH THAT HELP ME WITH MY QUESTION. I'm waiting with the torque wrench, 😆

Lowes sells the Craftsman 50-250 lb ft. click torque wrench for $89. It is awesome, long and super easy to set torque. I just bought it and used to do my front hubs and it is the best torque wrench I have used (and now own). You can't beat the quality and price.
 

Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Lowes sells the Craftsman 50-250 lb ft. click torque wrench for $89. It is awesome, long and super easy to set torque. I just bought it and used to do my front hubs and it is the best torque wrench I have used (and now own). You can't beat the quality and price.
Thanks, I already have one. I've done all the work I just need the torque specs for the calipers, 3 bolts on the hubs, 6 bolts on the CV axle, the struts, inner & outter tie rods. I'm doing both sides in front on my 02 Z71.
 

Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
I should have all you need, let me know if you need something more. Here is direct from the GM dealer service manual:

Anytime you have a "circle of nuts" to tighten (like below axle to flang and the lug nuts) you should do in a "star" pattern. Never do a "circle" pattern. Same with basically any multi-nut tightening situation.

For example using the wheel lug nuts (your's are 140 lb ft. torque):

View attachment 233260





The "Hub Nut" is what you call the main axle nut, per the manual, ***BE SURE TO GET NEW ONES DO NOT USE THE OLD ONES*** You can get GM original (I did recently) from Rock Auto for $6 each or Amazon or local shop.

Metric​
English​
Application​
Specification​
Hub Nut​
240 N·m​
177 lb ft​
Inboard Flange Bolts​
79 N·m​
58 lb ft​
Small Seal Retaining Clamp​
136 N·m​
100 lb ft​


Wheel Drive Shaft Replacement​

Tools Required
J 45859 Axle Remover (Should NOT NEED, just rubber mallet and tap axle from hub)

Removal Procedure


View attachment 233244

  1. Raise the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the wheel and tire assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  3. Remove the drive axle center cap, if equipped.

View attachment 233245



4. Insert a drift or a large screwdriver through the brake caliper into 1 of the brake rotor vanes in order to prevent the drive axle wheel drive shaft from turning.
5. Remove the nut and the washer from the hub. Do not reuse the nut. A new nut must be used when installing the wheel drive shaft.
6. Using the J 45859 or equivalent, press the wheel drive shaft from the hub.

View attachment 233246


7. Remove the 6 bolts (1) securing the wheel drive shaft inboard flange to the output shaft flange.
8. Remove the drift from the rotor.
9. Remove the stabilizer shaft link from the lower control arm. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in Front Suspension.
10. Wrap shop towels around both the inner and the outer wheel drive shaft boots in order to avoid damage to the boots during removal and installation.
11. Pull the wheel drive shaft through the lower control arm opening.

Installation Procedure


View attachment 233247

  1. Wrap shop towels around both the inner and the outer wheel drive shaft boots in order to avoid damage to the boots during removal and installation. Important
    Clean the steering knuckle and the wheel drive shaft splines and threads. These areas must be dry and free of grease, dirt, and contamination.
  2. Insert the wheel drive shaft splined shank into the knuckle hub.
    Notice
    Use only a genuine GM front wheel drive shaft nut. Installation of anything but an OEM front wheel drive shaft nut could cause damage to the vehicle.
  3. Install the washer (3) and the new hub nut (2) to the wheel drive shaft. Do not tighten the new hub nut at this time.
  4. Attach the wheel drive shaft inboard flange to the output shaft flange using the inboard flange bolts (1).
    View attachment 233248Notice
    Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.
  5. Insert a drift or a large screwdriver through the brake caliper into 1 of the brake rotor vanes in order to prevent the wheel drive shaft from turning. Tighten
    • Tighten the inboard flange bolts to 79 N·m (58 lb ft).
    • Tighten the hub nut to 240 N·m (177 lb ft).
  6. Remove the drift from the rotor.View attachment 233249
  7. Install the drive axle center cap, if equipped.
  8. Install the stabilizer shaft link. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in Front Suspension.
  9. Install the wheel and tire assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  10. Lower the vehicle.
Thank you so much. I saw this first on my email and it didn't show the pictures with the sequence but now that I got onto the club I see.
 

Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Thank you so much. I saw this first on my email and it didn't show the pictures with the sequence but now that I got onto the club I see.
I didn't see all the rest the email wouldn't show me. But now that I'm on the site I see all you left for me. Thank you tremendously! I didn't know about the lock tight, I already put the calipers and inner tie rod tie rod well everything together on one side yesterday and was just gonna do torque after. I torqued the lug nuts axle and axle nut but not the rest. I'll have to take it all off to do the caliper and tie rod with lock tight. I'll have to take a taxi to buy some. I need different grease too. Im working on the other side today. It's gonna be a nightmare too get this next hub off and I don't have that special tool. Thanks a bunch for taking your time to help me I really appreciate it! 😊
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
I didn't see all the rest the email wouldn't show me. But now that I'm on the site I see all you left for me. Thank you tremendously! I didn't know about the lock tight, I already put the calipers and inner tie rod tie rod well everything together on one side yesterday and was just gonna do torque after. I torqued the lug nuts axle and axle nut but not the rest. I'll have to take it all off to do the caliper and tie rod with lock tight. I'll have to take a taxi to buy some. I need different grease too. Im working on the other side today. It's gonna be a nightmare too get this next hub off and I don't have that special tool. Thanks a bunch for taking your time to help me I really appreciate it! 😊
You're welcome, glad I can help. You don't need any special tool for the hub. A hammer works great, if you're changing the CV axle assembly completely then no need to worry about banging on the old axle to knock out of hub. Are you replacing the hub as well or just the CV axle assembly and brake stuff?

NAPA has the correct loctite if you have one nearby. Otherwise you may need to order online for delivery.
 

Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
You're welcome, glad I can help. You don't need any special tool for the hub. A hammer works great, if you're changing the CV axle assembly completely then no need to worry about banging on the old axle to knock out of hub. Are you replacing the hub as well or just the CV axle assembly and brake stuff?

NAPA has the correct loctite if you have one nearby. Otherwise you may need to order online for delivery.
I'm replacing the hubs too and the inner and outter tie rods too. I already did one side and get the CV axle out the other side but gonna but rough getting this next hub off. I thought the last one was hard. I've hammered so much I could bearly get the three bolts out of the hub. It's rusted so bad and I'm almost positive has never been changed. I'll get it done just gonna take time. I do have a Napa in the next town about 5 miles away. Back home they delivered but don't do it here I'm pretty sure. Oh ya I'm also doing the small sway bars next to the wheels. Those probably have a torque ratio too, do you know?
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
I have all the info you need, just can't post right now, will do Monday for you.

My hub was rusted on as well and it was broken in half (wheel lug side came off leaving bearing side attached. It took me 6 hours to finally get free. Lots of PB Blaster, hit with torch for a bit to get PB Blaster moving, used a small handle 4 lb sledge hammer (from harbor freight) and a heavy duty steel chisel and hammered between the hub and knuckle at each bolt area. It finally moved ever so little, more PB Blaster, more hammering with chisel (hitting around different areas to nudge out). It finally came out just as it was getting too dark and I was about to give up! Don't give up! Look on the fascist YouTube for removing rusted hub, you can try the nut and bolt "method" if your hub is still in one piece, that may be easier and work, I just could not because my hub already broke in half.
 

Shylok's

Full Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Dang I did y even know a hub could break in half. Man I tried everything. Finally gave up at 10pm. Use wd40 Soo much. Can get the the plate I. The middle to move a bit side to side with the hammer. I hit the hub bolts out then put then through the holes and tried to hit and twist them into the e holes to push itself off that sortve helped the plate it what made be able to slightly move it with the hammer. I put the old rotor on backward and slammed that all day long. Sprayed the heck out of the tiny bit of cracks that I made between the knuckle and plate and I hope by tomorrow it will be looser. Gonna take a taxi and get bolts and nuts then put through the holes where the hub bolts were and ratchet them out with a big pipe I have for torque, that pipe helps a lot. This hub has been a nightmare. I don't even wanna think how hard the inner tie rod is gonna be. The one on the driver's side I thought was bad but everything on the passenger side is way way worse. They put stupid salt on all the RDS here and it rusts the f outta everybody's cars it's insane! I've never had a harder time working on a car in my life. And the caliper bolt on this one is a star and was stripped I hardly got that off. I even took the bar out of one of my jack stands to hit the back of it and a flathead inside the outter rim of the back of it to trust to loser the rust. I was thinking. Could I take the inner tie rod out so I can turn the hub to be able to get a better swing to the back of it, or is that a bad idea? Idk what else to do. Thank you.
 

EXT4ME

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We do not have rust issues here, but we do have sadistic, heavy handed service techs with air impact wrenches.

I went to change out the cv-axles, sway bar links, front brakes and wheel bearing hubs on my EXT a while back and I thought I was prepared.

I took the opportunity to buy a new, longer breaker bar and impact socket while gathering parts and supplies for the job.

Straight away, I found the cv-axle nuts had been smashed on by the last tech that had worked on my truck.

I tried the breaker bar, then a lube soak and then heat and then a four foot cheater pipe on my new breaker bar.

Now understand, there is no rust.

When gentle, steady application of force using the breaker bar and cheater pipe yielded no results, I carefully applied my full body weight to the end of the cheaper pipe.

The box end of the new breaker bar snapped clean off, leaving my impact socket still on the axle nut.

I then used my battery powered impact wrench until both batteries ran completely flat.

In the past, this tool had busted loose everything I used it on.

I do not have access to air tools at home, so I was left with either putting every thing back together and taking the truck to a mechanic shop just to have those nuts busted loose (and no telling what else), or I needed to come up with a better tool.

A quick search online found a more heavy duty corded impact wrench, with much more torque, at a nearby box store so I ran over in another vehicle and picked it up.

I applied another round of lube while I was gone to the store and I hit it with some heat when I got ready to smash on the nut with my new impact wrench.

I had to bear down with my new impact wrench for a good 3-5 minutes straight before the nut finally broke loose.

I was committed at this point and was either going to bust the nut loose or have to figure out a way to grind and cut it off.

The shaft was getting replaced anyway, so I figured that would be my last possible option.

I immediately moved over to the previously untouched passenger side and found the same thing over there.

What should have been a half day job ended up with me worn out and a day and a half spend cussing and sweating.

I now try to follow up and properly retorque any fasteners when I have work done on my vehicles.

I hope your repairs start to go better for you.
 

Shylok's

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Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
We do not have rust issues here, but we do have sadistic, heavy handed service techs with air impact wrenches.

I went to change out the cv-axles, sway bar links, front brakes and wheel bearing hubs on my EXT a while back and I thought I was prepared.

I took the opportunity to buy a new, longer breaker bar and impact socket while gathering parts and supplies for the job.

Straight away, I found the cv-axle nuts had been smashed on by the last tech that had worked on my truck.

I tried the breaker bar, then a lube soak and then heat and then a four foot cheater pipe on my new breaker bar.

Now understand, there is no rust.

When gentle, steady application of force using the breaker bar and cheater pipe yielded no results, I carefully applied my full body weight to the end of the cheaper pipe.

The box end of the new breaker bar snapped clean off, leaving my impact socket still on the axle nut.

I then used my battery powered impact wrench until both batteries ran completely flat.

In the past, this tool had busted loose everything I used it on.

I do not have access to air tools at home, so I was left with either putting every thing back together and taking the truck to a mechanic shop just to have those nuts busted loose (and no telling what else), or I needed to come up with a better tool.

A quick search online found a more heavy duty corded impact wrench, with much more torque, at a nearby box store so I ran over in another vehicle and picked it up.

I applied another round of lube while I was gone to the store and I hit it with some heat when I got ready to smash on the nut with my new impact wrench.

I had to bear down with my new impact wrench for a good 3-5 minutes straight before the nut finally broke loose.

I was committed at this point and was either going to bust the nut loose or have to figure out a way to grind and cut it off.

The shaft was getting replaced anyway, so I figured that would be my last possible option.

I immediately moved over to the previously untouched passenger side and found the same thing over there.

What should have been a half day job ended up with me worn out and a day and a half spend cussing and sweating.

I now try to follow up and properly retorque any fasteners when I have work done on my vehicles.

I hope your repairs start to go better for you.
Wow that sounds like a nightmare and something that seems to happen to me on a daily cuz everyone sucks here. From dentist, doctors, carpenters and mechanics I've had to learn all of it including plumbing to actually get the jobs done right but most of all to fix all the stuff that each one destroyed or made new problems. I've been trying to fix stuff other ppl did now for two years and am broke. I can't stand mechanics that have no care for the vehicles they're working on or act like they know what they're doing and lie doing a poop job like the last mechanic did to me. It took me two days and finally about a half hour ago I got the hub out. Some other mechanic he bent the inner circle pretty bad making water go straight in there and rusted. It so bad I thought I was gonna commit suicide haha.
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Wow that sounds like a nightmare and something that seems to happen to me on a daily cuz everyone sucks here. From dentist, doctors, carpenters and mechanics I've had to learn all of it including plumbing to actually get the jobs done right but most of all to fix all the stuff that each one destroyed or made new problems. I've been trying to fix stuff other ppl did now for two years and am broke. I can't stand mechanics that have no care for the vehicles they're working on or act like they know what they're doing and lie doing a poop job like the last mechanic did to me. It took me two days and finally about a half hour ago I got the hub out. Some other mechanic he bent the inner circle pretty bad making water go straight in there and rusted. It so bad I thought I was gonna commit suicide haha.
Sounds familiar! That's why I work on all my stuff myself if in any way possible. It's sickening how many "things" other people screw up when they work on "them".

Great to hear that you go the hub off, sounds about the same as my removal adventure. Here is the hub replacement info in case you still need. Let me know if you something more.


**** Be sure to clean the rotor surface of any rust and crap that faces (mounting surface) the new hub if you are using the old rotors. You can use a round wire brush on your drill, works great. You can also use that wire brush to really clean and remove the rust in the steering knuckle opening where the hub mounts.

You'll see below that you should coat the steering knuckle opening with bearing grease before mounting the hub, real important.


Wheel Hub, Bearing, and Seal Replacement 4WD​

Tools Required
J 45859 Axle Remover

Removal Procedure

  1. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  3. Remove the rotor. Refer to Brake Rotor Replacement - Front in Disc Brakes.1634003100200.png
  4. Remove the wheel speed sensor and brake hose mounting bracket bolt from the steering knuckle.1634003116428.png
  5. Remove the wheel drive shaft nut retaining cover.1634003150407.png Important
    Do not reuse the nut. A new nut must be used when installing the wheel drive shaft.
  6. Remove the wheel driveshaft assembly retaining nut (2) and washer (3) from the wheel driveshaft.1634003197825.png
  7. Disengage the wheel drive shaft from the wheel hub and bearing using J 45859 or equivalent.1634003224949.png
  8. Remove the wheel hub and the 15-series bearing mounting bolts (4).1634003238493.png
  9. Remove the wheel hub and bearing (4) mounting bolts, 25/35 series.
  10. Remove the wheel hub and bearing and splash shield from the vehicle.
  11. Remove the O-ring seal from the steering knuckle bore, 25/35 series.
  12. Remove the wheel speed sensor mounting bolt (5).
  13. Clean and inspect the O-ring seal, 25/35 series.
  14. Replace the seal if the following conditions exist:
    • Nicks
    • Cuts
    • Dry or brittle
    • Compression set

Installation Procedure

  1. Clean all corrosion or contaminates from the steering knuckle bore and the hub and bearing assembly.
  2. Lubricate the steering knuckle bore with wheel bearing grease or the equivalent.1634003261418.png
  3. Install the O-ring (7) to the steering knuckle, the 25/35 series.
    Notice
    Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.
  4. Install the wheel speed sensor mounting bolt to the wheel hub and bearing. Tighten the sensor mounting bolt to 18 N·m (13 lb ft).
  5. Install the wheel hub and bearing and splash shield to the vehicle, 25/35 series.1634003340442.png
  6. Install the wheel hub and bearing (5) and splash shield (6) to the vehicle, 15 series.
  7. Install the wheel hub and bearing mounting bolts, the 15 series.
  8. Install the wheel hub and bearing mounting bolts, 25/35 series. Tighten the wheel hub to knuckle bolts to 180 N·m (133 lb ft).1634003383077.png
  9. Install the nut (2) and washer (3) retaining the wheel drive shaft assembly to the wheel hub and bearing. Tighten the nut to 240 N·m (177 lb ft).
  10. Install the wheel speed sensor and brake hose mounting bracket bolt to the steering knuckle. Tighten the brake hose clip bolt to 12 N·m (106 lb in).
  11. Install the rotor. Refer to Brake Rotor Replacement - Front in Disc Brakes.
  12. Install the tire and wheel. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Tires and Wheels.
  13. Lower the vehicle .
 

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Shylok's

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Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Thank you. I didn't know about greasing the the inside of the stealing knuckle. I've gotta take off the other side I did anyways to put locktight and I bought some regular caliper bolts to replace the star ones. Thank you! 😊
 

2003VAAV

Full Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
85
Location
VA or FL or NC or ?
Thank you. I didn't know about greasing the the inside of the stealing knuckle. I've gotta take off the other side I did anyways to put locktight and I bought some regular caliper bolts to replace the star ones. Thank you! 😊
Taking off the caliper bolts to loctite is okay and good. I would not remove new hub installation unless you have a new axle nut to use. The three hub to knuckle bolts do not use any loctite so that's not a problem. And if you did not grease the steering knuckle and you already properly torqued the bolts you should be okay as long as you had the hub seated all the way in before torquing. I know that I said "real important" about the grease but maybe not "that" important if the hub was seated completely before you torqued. You just may have a harder time replacing again in the future.
 
Last edited:

Shylok's

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Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Taking off the caliper bolts to loctite is okay and good. I would not remove new hub installation unless you have a new axle nut to use. The three hub to knuckle bolts do not use any loctite so that's not a problem. And if you did not grease the steering knuckle and you already properly torqued the bolts you should be okay as long as you had the hub seated all the way in before torquing. I know that I said "real important" about the grease but maybe not "that" important if the hub was seated completely before you torqued. You just may have a harder time replacing again in the future.
Oh gosh thanks for reminding me! I've been so scatterbrained with everything I totally forgot and would taken off the axle nut! If you see this, could you remind me how much to torque the e knuckle bolts to the hub please I forgot? Just now replacing the hub assembly on the passenger side now. Have to grease hubs too. So much I didn't know and forgot about. Thanks again. Without this club I would've not know any torque for anything and I want to do everything perfect. My poor beautiful truck deserves it especially how these last mechanics ffd her up.
 

Shylok's

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Mar 28, 2021
Messages
42
Oh one more thing. How do I know what series my truck is? It's an 02' z71 Avalanche 5.3L. Just want to make exact sure. Thanks again.
 
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